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UK Radio Station Says "Hello" To Socially Isolated Man

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Social isolation doesn't only occur during youth and adolescence. A 95 year old man named Bill called his local radio station in the UK to talk about how lonely he was. He said, "Unfortunately, when you get old, people don't visit. That's life."

In response, the DJ and radio staff picked him up and had him over to the station for coffee and to chat. Let us use this story as not only a reminder of the kindness that exists in the world, but as a reminder that we can all do our part to help ease social isolation. It's as simple as a phone call, a coffee date, a nice, "Hello", or a quick lunch.

Read more about their heartwarming story here: http://abcn.ws/1NrA600

#‎StartWithHello

Sandy Hook Promise Program Helps Avert School Shooting

"It is so important to listen to young people who come to us for help.” 


 

Earlier this month, SHP's #SaySomething program helped stop a planned school shooting at a Cincinnati Middle School. The student made the threat in the building to other students and mentioned having another student recruited to shoot at students. If not for a brave student and an educated, compassionate guidance counselor, it had the potential to be carried out.

The school’s guidance counselor told us, “As we were preparing for Say Something Week, a student who was training to be a Say Something leader came to talk to me about hearing another student make threats to bomb the school, and was recruiting another student to shoot escaping students. Because I had been trained in Say Something, I knew how to deal with this risk. Upon investigation, the student making the threats was arrested and taken into custody.”

She went on to say, “I wouldn’t have known about this unless that student had said something to me. Say Something demonstrates the important role young people play in looking out for each other and in being the ears and eyes of their school. It also demonstrates why it is so important to listen to young people who come to us for help.” The school resource officer, Dean Doerflein, said the alleged threats were overhead by several other students and caused some panic throughout the school early on, but all avenues were investigated by police and the school was deemed safe.

We are so fortunate that the threat in Cincinnati was averted and we can’t adequately express our gratitude and appreciation for the heroic student that reported what they had heard. When we give students the tools to safely, effectively report threats, and assure them that they’re trusted and will be listened to by teachers and elders, we open the doors to better communication, which creates a safer environment for all.

Stories like this stress the importance of this free, effective program and prove how easy it can be to #ProtectOurKids. Students are the eyes and ears of our schools and when we teach them how to safely and quickly report a threat; those threats don't have time to turn into tragedies.

 

For more on how you can bring Say Something to your school or community, please visit: http://www.sandyhookpromise.org/bringsaysomething

For more on how Say Something worked in the Cincinnati school, click here: http://cin.ci/1P9XocH

 

This Domestic Violence Awareness Month, Don't Wait, Act Now

"There is a deadly relationship between guns and violence against women in America. Research shows that more than half of women murdered with guns in 2011 were killed by intimate partners or family members. When a gun is present in a domestic violence situation, women are not safe -- in fact, it is five times more likely they will be killed." #‎DVAM

Read more: http://huff.to/1k4WNNF

Study: Most Americans See Mass Shootings as a Mental Health Issue

When faced with determining if mental health or gun laws play a larger factor in mass shootings and gun violence, Americans are divided on what the best solution is for stopping such tragedies. But what if we told you the answer was both? It will take mental health and wellness reform and simultaneous policy action to #‎StopGunViolence.

Read more: http://abcn.ws/1We3nDc

A Note from an SHP Promise Leader

"I'm not going to lie; I was going to ignore your email. I am nervous about doing this, and not sure how I will be able to make a difference. I was just going to keep giving small donations, hitting 'like' on Facebook, and talking with my friends about how frustrated/scared we were. Not doing much, but enough to (slightly) ease my conscience.


Well, I can't anymore. Once again I am sitting at my computer crying after reading about *another* mass shooting. I am listening to my children play upstairs and thanking the universe it wasn't their school, it wasn't my family - but it could be. If Congress won't step up to make the changes our country so desperately needs, then it is up to us."

 

Never doubt that you CAN make a difference, we Promise and we believe in you.

-Sandy Hook Promise

Sandy Hook Promise Program Helps Avert School Shooting

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PRESS RELEASE 

October 22, 2015

 

PRESS CONTACT

Nicole Hockley
Sandy Hook Promise
nicole.hockley@sandyhookpromise.org
203.610.5710



Sandy Hook Promise “Say Something”
Prevents Cincinnati School Tragedy


“Say Something”, the free research-based program developed by Sandy Hook Promise, is already having an impact. During this week’s national Say Something Week, over 200,000 students in grades 6-12 will be trained how to recognize warning signs, signals and threats from friends or individuals who may want to hurt themselves or others, and intervene by talking to a trusted adult to get help. Students and school members who have been trained previously are already seeing the benefit of the program.

“I never imagined how immediately Say Something would become relevant in our school,” said a middle school Guidance Counselor in Cincinnati. “As we were preparing for Say Something Week, a student who was training to be a Say Something leader came to talk to me about hearing another student make threats to bomb the school, and was recruiting another student to shoot escaping students. Because I had been trained in Say Something, I knew how to deal with this risk. Upon investigation, the student making the threats was arrested and taken into custody.

“I wouldn’t have known about this unless that student had said something to me. Say Something demonstrates the important role young people play in looking out for each other and in being the ears and eyes of their school. It also demonstrates why it is so important to listen to young people who come to us for help.”

When it comes to acts of violence, including suicide and threats to others, most are communicated in some way before the incident occurs. In fact, in 4 out of 5 school shootings, the attacker told people of his/her plans ahead of time and 70% of people who die by suicide told someone of their intention or gave some type of warning or indication. By teaching our youth how to properly identify and report threats, they can help keep themselves, their friends and their family safe.

“Our Say Something program has the potential to protect thousands of children,” said Nicole Hockley, Managing Director of Sandy Hook Promise and mother of 6-year-old Dylan Hockley who was also killed in the Sandy Hook tragedy. “We want schools and youth organizations across the country to join us October 19-23, or any other time, in raising awareness, educating students and the community and saving lives. We’ve already seen how it has protected students in Cincinnati. Imagine how many families could be spared the agony of losing a loved one if teens knew how to Say Something about their peers who may be threatening to hurt themselves or others.”

All schools and youth organizations are encouraged to register to participate in Say Something Week at www.sandyhookpromise.org/saysomethingweek and help their students be trained in how to prevent tragedies and “Say Something” to a trusted adult. Once registered, users will be given digital access, at no-cost, to Say Something training materials. By participating they may also be eligible to apply for a special $10,000 “Say Something” award. (Rules and the entry form are on the website.)


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About Sandy Hook Promise
Sandy Hook Promise (SHP) is a national, nonprofit organization based in Newtown, Connecticut. We are led by several family members whose loved ones were killed in the tragic mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School on December 14, 2012 that claimed the lives of 20 first-graders and 6 educators. Sandy Hook Promise is focused on preventing gun violence (and all violence) BEFORE it happens by educating and mobilizing parents, schools and communities on mental health and wellness programs that identify, intervene and help at-risk individuals. SHP is a moderate, above-the-politics organization that supports sensible non-policy and policy solutions that protect children and prevent gun violence. Our intent is to honor all victims of gun violence by turning our tragedy into a moment of transformation. Make the Promise at www.sandyhookpromise.org

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From the National Journal: How does Someone Become a School Shooter?

"Of­ten, shoot­ers tell someone what they plan to do, an ac­tion known as “leak­age,” but fre­quently those com­ments aren’t con­veyed be­fore a shoot­ing oc­curs. Sandy Hook Prom­ise, a non­profit launched by those who lost loved ones in the Decem­ber 2012 mas­sacre, has launched a “Say something” cam­paign to en­cour­age middle- and high-school stu­dents to tell school of­fi­cials or other trus­ted adults if they see or hear threats or oth­er warn­ing signs."
Read more from the National Journal article here: http://bit.ly/1OJ8Eht

Gov. Malloy to visit Danbury High School to Salute District's Commitment to Sandy Hook Program

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MEDIA ADVISORY                                                                                      PRESS CONTACT

October 20, 2015                                                                                          Nicole Hockley

                                                                                                                     Sandy Hook Promise

                                                                                                                     nicole.hockley@sandyhookpromise.org

                                                                                                                      203.610.5710

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           

Governor Dannel Malloy Supports

Sandy Hook Promise’s “Say Something” Week

 

Public Proclamation from Gov. Malloy on Thursday, October 22

1200 people from Danbury School Create Logo, Friday, October 23

 

 

When it comes to acts of violence, including suicide and threats to others, most are communicated in some way before the incident occurs. In fact, in 4 out of 5 school shootings, the attacker told people of his/her plans ahead of time and 70% of people who die by suicide told someone of their intention or gave some type of warning or indication. Imagine how many of these tragedies could be averted if someone said something?

 

That’s the problem Sandy Hook Promise wants to solve. Their free program, “Say Something”, teaches students in grades 6 -12 how to recognize warning signs, signals and threats, especially in social media, from friends or individuals who may want to hurt themselves or others and then to intervene and Say Something to a trusted adult to get help.

 

“Most of the time, warning signs of violence are communicated in advance, such as on social media, or can be observed in a person’s behavior.  Unfortunately, not everyone knows what to do with that information,” said Mark Barden, Managing Director of Sandy Hook Promise and father of 7-year-old Daniel Barden who was killed at Sandy Hook Elementary School.  “Young people are the eyes and ears of their schools and community.  We can teach them how to properly identify and report threats, keeping themselves, their friends and their family safe.  They have the power to save lives.”

 

Governor Dannel P. Malloy agrees that the program can be hugely beneficial to schools across Connecticut.  “I’m inspired to see such a positive and beneficial program developed from the tragedy at Sandy Hook Elementary School.  We know that early identification and intervention can make a huge difference in a person’s life, especially if they are moving along the violence continuum.  Teens and adolescents can really help each other and their schools by looking after each other and taking action when they see, read or hear something that could lead to violence or demonstrates other at-risk behaviors.  The “Say Something” program does more than prevent violence and gun violence.  It can help students with a multitude of social and behavioral issues that they may face every day.”

 

Governor Mallow is proclaiming the week of October 19-23 as “Say Something Week” and will be making the proclamation official at Danbury High School in Danbury on Thursday, October 22 at 1:30pm.  Participating schools and students, as well as members of Sandy Hook Promise, will also be attending.

 

Broadview Middle School in Danbury is celebrating “Say Something” by implementing the training in their school and culminating with a “Wear Green for Say Something” day on Friday, October 23.  At 9:00am that day, all 1200 attending students and staff will form the “Say Something” logo on the field between the school and Danbury Hospital.  Mark Barden of Sandy Hook Promise and Mayor Mark D. Boughton will also be attending.

 

Media are invited to attend both events.

 

To participate in “Say Something Week” or to implement Say Something training at another time, schools and youth organizations across the country are encouraged to register at www.sandyhookpromise.org/saysomethingweek.  Schools and youth organizations that participate during the week of October 19-23 may also be eligible to apply for a special $10,000 “Say Something” award.

 

By registering, schools and youth organizations will be given digital access to no-cost and easy to implement Say Something training materials, presentations and a planning guide. The training can be done in an assembly, classroom or through student leaders and only takes 25-45 minutes.  If help is needed, Sandy Hook Promise can work with the school to deliver the program and/or provide a trainer, if available.  All training materials and resources are completely free.

 

The program is based on research conducted by Dr. Dewey Cornell and Dr. Reid Meloy, two leading national experts in threat assessment and intervention.

 

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About Sandy Hook Promise

Sandy Hook Promise (SHP) is a national, nonprofit organization based in Newtown, Connecticut. We are led by several family members whose loved ones were killed in the tragic mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School on December 14, 2012 that claimed the lives of 20 first-graders and 6 educators. Sandy Hook Promise is focused on preventing gun violence (and all violence) BEFORE it happens by educating and mobilizing parents, schools and communities on mental health and wellness programs that identify, intervene and help at-risk individuals. SHP is a moderate, above-the-politics organization that supports sensible non-policy and policy solutions that protect children and prevent gun violence. Our intent is to honor all victims of gun violence by turning our tragedy into a moment of transformation. Make the Promise at www.sandyhookpromise.org

 

 

 

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